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at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt ablocksblockbustermega deals buo medium companies, why is that. >> to do a step out deal therehe sense that things are good. m & a needs to be done. growth is thro slow and one of e ways to rise is to buy. everything is good but we have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech could be an air yeah wirarea. what kind of gived guidelines can you give to investors so they can take advantage of these trends. >> there is a huge boom inenergd healthcarhealthcare in
room safety and efficiency. erika miller, "n.b.r.," manhasset, new york. >> bob baur is the chief global economist at principle global investors, with $275 billion on management. bob, the higher productive numbers, will that lead to more hiring, regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff? >> i think it will. we have said for some time that businesses have pushed productivity as far as they can. if we continue at a modest, 2.5% growth rate, that will be enough that businesses will be forced to higher at a faster pace. >> tom: but we're not hearing a lot of confidence coming from the business community. we're seeing it in housing and automotive sales, but in terms of hiring, it is languishing. why do you think that difference exists? >> i think business is looking ahead. there is a real dichotomy, as you mentioned, between businesses and costumers. businesses are looking ahead, and they're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already taking action today to try to prepare for that e
and we talk with tennessee republican senator bob corker. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wak
: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the economy to grow a bit. >> susie: what if there isn't a deal? does that mean there is going to be a sell-off or a correction in the markets? >> i think the hype in the recent days that a deal is coming is certainly responsible for the rally. i think if there is no deal, and the probabilities of that have gone down, thankfully, but if there is no deal, i still think we're not going to go off some nasty cliff that people are worried about. that is to say, the treasury and the
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entit
which work directly with sandy relief. bob ottenhoff is the president and c.e.o. of the center for disaster philanthropy. >> most giving to disasters occurs in the first month, but as we now know with sandy the challenges to relief to disasters go on for a long period of time. so we're still going to need lots of charitable contributions for the recovery and rebuilding period. >> reporter: the red cross has already raised $188 million for sandy relief and expects to use more than half of that by the end of the month. but with every disaster, there are always some bad actors. new york state has been at the forefront of holding non-profits accountable. the state attorney general has asked more than 75 charities to show where their sandy relief donations are going. >> these scammers tend to take advantage of people in emotional situations, when they're very concerned about things like disaster relief, and will respond to an ad or an email without really taking the extra step of checking. >> reporter: schneiderman hopes other states follow suit and ask non-profits to disclose infor
total fabrication and to do it as bob dole sat there on the senate floor asking for their support is a travesty. >> woodruff: gentlemen, thank you both. mark shields, david brooks. and mark and david will keep up the talk on the doubleheader recorded in our newsroom and that will be posted at the top of the rundown later tonight. >> brown: finally tonight, doling out history lessons on twitter. gwen ifill has that. >> ifill: newshour regular michael beschloss has written eight books and count its commentaries on the american presidenciment but recently he's discovered a new way to engage a different audience. taking us back to the nation's contemporary history in 140 characters or less. michael joins us now. michael, what is with the 140 character chunks, when did you start dolling out history this way. >> it is an antidote to the wrong looks i write. it was actually during one of the debates right here in the studio we were watching, as you remember. and christina arc, countries tina saw me looking at a search engine with twitter comments. and she said why don't you just go on tw
have higher tax rates on top earners. tennessee senator bob corker told fox news sunday that republicans should give ground on taxes and concentrate on long-term spending cuts. >> the focus then shifts to entitlements. maybe that puts us in a place where we actually can do something that really saves this nation. so there is a growing body -- i actually am beginning to believe that is the best route for us to take. >> woodruff: but on nbc, house majority whip kevin mccarthy countered that that approach is the wrong way to go. >> it doesn't solve the problem. the president is asking for higher rates, he's asking for more revenue. most economists agree the best way to get that is through closing special loopholes. when you close those it makes a fair tax process. >> woodruff: a new poll from politico and george washington university backed the president's position. 60% favored raising taxes on households earning more than $250,000 a year. 38% were opposed. another survey last week found that by a 2-to-1 margin, americans would blame republicans if there's no agreement by t
protecting social security, max richman; and republican senator bob corker. gwen ifill has our next installment. >> ifill: a senior democrat on the house banking committee and the vice chair of the centrist new democrat coalition. welcome, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carney at the white house, one saying spending cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spending cuts over and above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth
department did not shift funds or ask for emergency money. bob corker of tennessee minced no words in his assessment. >> what i saw in the report is a department that has sclerosis. that doesn't think outside the box. that is not using the resources that it has in any kind of creative ways. is not prioritizing. i cannot imagine sending folks out to benghazi after what we saw from the security cameras and the drones. >> reporter: deputy secretary burns said the answer, in part, is that despite growing lawlessness in benghazi, in his words, "we made the mistaken assumption that we wouldn't become a major target." >> the truth is, across eastern there had been a tendency-- not just in the case of eastern libya, but i think across the world in recent years-- for us to focus too much on specific credible threats, and sometimes and, i think that's something that, you know, we were painfully reminded of in the case of the benghazi attack, and we need to do better at. >> reporter: to that end, deputy secretary nides promised swift action on all of the report's 29 recommendations. >> implementatio
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10